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Enjoy this free knit potholder pattern that uses the linen stitch for its lovely and flat design.

Several readers said they had enough knit washcloth and dishcloth patterns but could really use some knit potholder patterns. Thank you to those readers! It makes my job so much easier when I know what you want and need!

hands using knit potholder to hold cake.

So, without further ado, here’s the first Knit Potholder pattern to appear on this site. And if you would prefer a crochet potholder, here’s one for you!

I wanted a flat stitch without much surface texture for this first knit potholder pattern, and linen stitch was what made the most sense. Coupled with the fact that the linen stitch will always lay flat, making it an even better choice for potholders.

are you a visual learner?

I’ve gotcha covered!

I made a Pinterest Video for you to see the stitches and techniques involved with knitting the linen stitch knit potholder. You can watch it here. Save it to your Knit board on Pinterest to refer to it in the future and to help others find our work.

Two white knit potholders on a white counter.

What type of yarn should you use for a potholder?

Without exception, you want to use 100% cotton yarn for any potholder. Here’s why:

  • It won’t melt! Rather significant when handling hot things.
  • It is washable! For the same reason that cotton is great for knit and crochet washcloths, it is also great for potholders. It is a fiber that withstands multiple washings without felting, like wool.
  • Cotton will hold its shapes when wet, given its inelasticity.

I tried several different cotton yarns for this pattern. I wanted it to be a quick knit, so I was looking for bulky cotton yarn. Truthfully, there just aren’t many choices, but I did land on Hoooked Spesso 100% cotton yarn. This yarn is similar to a soft and pliable cotton rope, which is good when trying to knit. Some of the other rope-ish materials were too stiff, making them very difficult to knit.

Full disclosure: I like how the Spesso knit up, but it did twist while I was knitting. I had to untwist it a couple of times for each potholder. I finally unwound it from the spool and formed a ball, which helped. Maybe balancing out the twisty nature, a $12 spool of yarn will knit 4 potholders, so that’s pretty good economics.

If you are looking for handmade gifts for Christmas or housewarmings, these potholders will fit that bill perfectly!

hands using knit potholder to hold cake.

Subscribers to Nourish and Nestle can nab the free, printable pattern in the Library. If you would like to receive the printable pattern pdf directly to your email inbox, click the button below.

Materials Needed for a 7″ by 7″ Knit Potholder

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Stitches Used

  • K -Knit
  • P – Purl
  • sl1k- slip one knitwise
  • wyib—with yarn in back
  • sl1p- slip one purlwise
  • wyif—with yarn in front

Gauge

  • 11 stitches in linen stitch and 19 rows over 4 inches.

Instructions to Knit a 7″ by 7″ Potholder

  • Cast on 22 stitches (or a multiple of 2)
  • Row 1 and all odd rows:  sl1k, k, *wyif sl1p, wyib k* (you will end with a k)
  • Row 2 and all even rows: sl1p, p,  *wyib sl1p, wyif p* (you will end with a purl)
  • Repeat until work is 7” long  (approximately 31 rows) or as long as it is wide.
  • Bind off in the linen stitch pattern and work in ends.
  • Attach faux leather hook (optional)

Bookmark this page or pin the following image to return to this Knit Potholder pattern in the future.

Two hands using knit potholders to hold cake.

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2 Comments

  1. Helen Bearden

    August 5, 2022 at 6:30 pm

    I bought some 75% cotton and 25% recycled fibers Cora’s Craft Cord listed as 5 Bulky with size 13 needles for knitting. It is hand wash cold, lay flat to dry. Will it work for this type of project?

    Reply
    • lynn

      August 6, 2022 at 9:06 am

      Good Morning Helen!

      My gut tells me it’ll be fine. But, I would do a quick burn test to make sure you don’t have acrylic as some of the recycled fibers. To do the burn test, simply place a piece of the cord in a fireproof container and ignite one end. Cotton smells like burning paper and will leave a gray/white ash residue.

      And truthfully, I can’t imagine that if it is mostly cotton, you couldn’t machine wash it. Its up to you, but I’d want to be able to wash it regularly.

      Let me know how you proceed.

      Hugs, Lynn

      Reply

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